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On 3/2/2018 at 5:31 AM, sujithputhranartist said:

Yesterdays click

Holy Cow

Vasai, India

aaaaaaaa.jpg

1/400 sec
f/2.4
ISO 100

if anyone wants to use this image as a reference for art, you are welcome :)

Please Sujith,what makes this cow holy?

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41 minutes ago, Cgegege said:

What is the different between India cow and other cows around the world?

It's a part of the religion, it's not about what kind of cow it is;)

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2 hours ago, hj27 said:

My kids really love sausages. Does this make pigs also sacred animals? :P

if you could get their meat without killing them, it would be possible ;)
But maybe, I need to go to India again in April for a Business Trip - then, I could ask my indian collegues :)

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21 hours ago, Jemmy said:

Please Sujith,what makes this cow holy?

 

18 hours ago, Teis91 said:

I think every cow is holy in India ;)

 

17 hours ago, CChris said:

Yes, Cows are holy in India :)
And as far as I have learned, the question "what makes the cow holy" can be answered just with:

- They spent their milk to feed your Kids.
Is it right? @sujithputhranartist

 

16 hours ago, Cgegege said:

What is the different between India cow and other cows around the world?

 

15 hours ago, Teis91 said:

It's a part of the religion, it's not about what kind of cow it is;)

 

13 hours ago, ArTdIeM said:

It could be from Rome or Mecca

 

8 hours ago, Coinbiz said:

No wonder the herdsmen are on rampage here... I have some holy cow around here too.

 

7 hours ago, Gates said:

It has always been interesting why the holy animal in India is the cow

 

6 hours ago, Artdeacon said:

Can somebody distinguishe between India cow and other cow in the world

 

5 hours ago, dRealCrypto said:

So, people are cow worshippers in India. I cannot believe this guy

 

4 hours ago, hj27 said:

My kids really love sausages. Does this make pigs also sacred animals? :P

 

2 hours ago, CChris said:

if you could get their meat without killing them, it would be possible ;)
But maybe, I need to go to India again in April for a Business Trip - then, I could ask my indian collegues :)

Millions of Hindus revere and worship cows. Hinduism is a religion that raises the status of Mother to the level of Goddess. Therefore, the cow is considered a sacred animal, as it provides us life sustaining milk. The cow is seen as a maternal figure, a care taker of her people. The cow is a symbol of the divine bounty of earth.

Lord Krishna, one of the most well known of the Hindu deities is often depicted playing his flute amongst cows and dancing Gopis (milkmaids). He grew up as a cow herder. Krishna also goes by the names Govinda and Gopala, which literally mean “friend and protector of cows.” It is considered highly auspicious for a true devotee to feed a cow, even before eating breakfast oneself.

Throughout the Vedic scriptures there are verses which emphasize that the cow must be protected and cared for. It is considered a sin to kill a cow and eat its meat. Even today in India, there are many states in which the slaughter of cows is illegal. That is why you can find cows roaming freely all over India, even along the busy streets of Delhi and Mumbai.

Ayurveda is a big proponent of the sattvic qualities of milk and dairy products. That is why most Hindus are vegetarian, but not vegan. Fresh, organic milk, yogurt, buttermilk, paneer (homemade cheese) and ghee, are all considered highly nutritious, and an important part of the diet. Not only do these dairy products provide important protein and calcium for our tissues, but are sources of Ojas, which gives our body strength and immunity.

Besides their milk, cows also provide many practical purposes, and are considered a real blessing to the rural community. On the farm, bulls are used to plough the fields and as a means of transportation of goods. Even Lord Shiva’s trusted vehicle is Nandi– the sacred bull.

Cow dung is saved and used for fuel, as it is high in methane, and can generate heat and electricity. Many village homes are plastered with a mud/cow dung mixture, which insulates the walls and floors from extreme hot and cold temperatures. Cow dung is also rich in minerals, and makes an excellent fertilizer. There is a big organic farming movement in India to return to ancient methods of utilizing cow dung to re-mineralize the depleted soil.

In such a spiritual land as India, one can find religious ceremonies taking place at any time and any place. Spiritual “yagnas” are fire ceremonies that performed to thank the Gods and receive their blessings. Cows even play a central role in these fire yagnas or Agnihotras. Scientific research has found that the ritual of burning cow dung and ghee as fuel for these sacred fires, actually purifies the air, and has anti-pollutant and anti-radiation qualities in the environment.

Ayurveda understands that some physical and emotional health crisis can not be healed by diet and herbs alone. They need the deeper and subtler healing of these types of Vedic ritual ceremonies to clear astrological past karma. The holy cow again offers its bounty by providing the ingredients in the Panchamrit, or blessed drink, that is distributed after the ceremony. Panchamrit translates as “sacred ambrosia” or “nectar of the gods” and is made up of 5 items – milk, yogurt, ghee, honey and sugar. By drinking this sweet prasadam, one is infused with the divine energy created during the puja, and is healed.

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IF my company will send me to India again this year, I will try to take some photographs this time.
The last time, I went there last year, I haven't had the time at all, because we were working basically 10 days without having one day off ... so I was not able to do some photography - but I think, there are many things, that could be interesting for the others here, because most of the european don't know much about the culture and the living in this country :)

That a cow is a spiritual animal in India, you will learn very early, while you are driving throught the streets.
A cow is f.e. allowed "to stay everywhere".

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18 hours ago, CChris said:

IF my company will send me to India again this year, I will try to take some photographs this time.
The last time, I went there last year, I haven't had the time at all, because we were working basically 10 days without having one day off ... so I was not able to do some photography - but I think, there are many things, that could be interesting for the others here, because most of the european don't know much about the culture and the living in this country :)

That a cow is a spiritual animal in India, you will learn very early, while you are driving throught the streets.
A cow is f.e. allowed "to stay everywhere".

2

Yes, you are right :) Cows are very sacred in India, If you kill a cow, the maximum term of imprisonment varies from 6 months to 5 years and the fine from ₹1,000 to ₹10,000. Delhi and Madhya Pradesh have fixed a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment for 6 months.In Gujarat state, punishment for cow slaughter is life imprisonment.

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