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Found 48 results

  1. ART lowers Stress

    Stress-related hormone cortisol lowers significantly after just 45 minutes of art creation Whether you’re Van Gogh or a stick-figure sketcher, a new Drexel University study found that making art can significantly reduce stress-related hormones in your body. Although the researchers from Drexel’s College of Nursing and Health Professions believed that past experience in creating art might amplify the activity’s stress-reducing effects, their study found that everyone seems to benefit equally. “It was surprising and it also wasn’t,” said Girija Kaimal, EdD, assistant professor of creative arts therapies. “It wasn’t surprising because that’s the core idea in art therapy: Everyone is creative and can be expressive in the visual arts when working in a supportive setting. That said, I did expect that perhaps the effects would be stronger for those with prior experience.” The results of the study were published in Art Therapy under the title “Reduction of Cortisol Levels and Participants’ Responses Following Art Making.” Kendra Ray, a doctoral student under Kaimal, and Juan Muniz, PhD, an assistant teaching professor in the Department of Nutrition Sciences, served as co-authors. “Biomarkers” are biological indicators (like hormones) that can be used to measure conditions in the body, such as stress. Cortisol was one such the hormone measured in the study through saliva samples. The higher a person’s cortisol level, the more stressed a person is likely to be. F or Kaimal’s study, 39 adults, ranging from 18 to 59 years old, were invited to participate in 45 minutes of art-making. Cortisol levels were taken before and after the art-making period. Materials available to the participants included markers and paper, modeling clay and collage materials. There were no directions given and every participant could use any of the materials they chose to create any work of art they desired. An art therapist was present during the activity to help if the participant requested any. Of those who took part in the study, just under half reported that they had limited experience in making art. The researchers found that 75 percent of the participants’ cortisol levels lowered during their 45 minutes of making art. And while there was some variation in how much cortisol levels lowered, there was no correlation between past art experiences and lower levels. Written testimonies of their experiences afterward revealed how the participants felt about the creating art. “It was very relaxing,” one wrote. “After about five minutes, I felt less anxious. I was able to obsess less about things that I had not done or need [ed]to get done. Doing art allowed me to put things into perspective.” However, roughly 25 percent of the participants actually registered higher levels of cortisol — though that wasn’t necessarily a bad thing. “Some amount of cortisol is essential for functioning,” Kaimal explained. “For example, our cortisol levels vary throughout the day — levels are highest in the morning because that gives us an energy boost to us going at the start of the day. It could’ve been that the art-making resulted in a state of arousal and/or engagement in the study’s participants.” Kaimal and her team believed, going into the study, that the type of art materials used by participants might affect cortisol levels. They thought that the less-structured mediums — using clay or drawing with markers — would result in lower cortisol levels than the structured — collaging. That, however, wasn’t supported by the results, as no significant correlation was found. The study did find a weak correlation between age and lower cortisol levels. Younger participants exhibited consistently lower cortisol levels after they’d created art. Those results made Kaimal wonder about how young college students and high school students deal with the stress that comes from academia — and how creative arts can help. “I think one reason might be that younger people are developmentally still figuring out ways to deal with stress and challenges, while older individuals — just from having lived life and being older — might have more strategies to problem-solve and manage stress more effectively,” Kaimal said. In light of that, Kaimal plans to extend the study to explore whether “creative self- expression in a therapeutic environment can help reduce stress.” In that study, other biomarkers like alpha amylase and oxytocin will also be measured to give a more comprehensive picture. Additionally, Kaimal also plans to study how visual arts-based expression affects end-of-life patients and their caregivers. “We want to ultimately examine how creative pursuits could help with psychological well-being and, therefore, physiological health, as well,” she said.
  2. Charcoal on Paper | Commissioned Portrait

    My new Charcoal sketch on Paper
  3. Zeus: Sketching Tutorial by me

    Zeus Charcoal & Graphite on Paper Size:67.4 x 54 cms Zeus is the God of paradise and thunder of ancient Greek religion, which ruled the mountain like the king of Olympus. His name is cognitive with the first element of his Roman counterpart Jupiter, his mythology and strength are the same, but Indra, Jupiter, Perun, Thor, and Odin are not like the Indo-European gods. Why Cast sketch practice is important : It is important to complete the projection of shadow to give instructions about the object's perspective, Some artists create the shadow to show the depth of the object. In many cases, this is very acceptable. However, it is much more technical to include perspective and different principles of perspective i.e., cast + core shadows Art Materials used: Paper: Fabriano Accademia 200 gsm Drawing: Staedtler lumograph graphite pencils(h,b,2b) Derwent Charcoal pencils(Dark,Medium, Light) Eraser: Prismacolor Kneaded Eraser Staedtler Mars Plastic Eraser Rendering Materials: Tortillions: Soft Tissues: Ear Buds: Mahl Stick Step 1 (Contour): Contour is an artistic technique used in the drawing industry. Normal lines are used to make the rough outline to have a rough idea of subject’s length and width, thickness, depth, perspective. The purpose of the Contour is to highlight the scale and volume, ignoring the details of the subject to give a three-dimensional perspective. Step 2 (Contour 2): We start working with the use of mahl stick from left and move forward to right because of me being right handed, this helps me to have a clear view of the portion I am sketching In this step, we complete the basic contour drawing and we get the idea of the depth and shape, so now we can start working on the details. Step 3 (Soft Details) : After the basic outlines of the subject, we start with the details of hair, ear & beard from the mid-tones and then use charcoal to get the dark shadows, then we apply medium strokes on the eye which gives some depth & our figure starts evolving out from paper.Then we want a background, which makes up surroundings and empty space making the subject look 3 -dimensional. Step 4 (Final) We give highlights of hair and beard using a kneaded eraser and Staedtler plastic eraser, it can be used for erasing any wrong strokes & also to make a partial highlight or stand out by removing the charcoal dust from the paper. Staedtler graphite pencils are used to give very light strokes because use of charcoal for the light parts can be very risky at times, sometimes it is not possible to remove all the charcoal dust from the paper creating a bad spot in our artwork I have worked a lot on this sketch and have taken care of every detail to make this sketch look 3d AfterCrop So our Zeus is complete and looks amazing, I am very happy with the outcome. I have clicked this image from Olympus VG-120 and cropped it. for more such Artworks & work in process follow SUJITH PUTHRAN
  4. Saxophone player

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: Saxophone playerMedium : Pastel on toned paper Size: 63.5 x 48.2 cms
  5. Delightful Bath 

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: Delightful Bath Medium: Color pencil on Paper Size: 75 x 55 cms
  6. Realistic Colored Pencil on Paper

    Title: Delightful Bath Medium: Colored Pencil on Black Paper Size: 75 x 55 cms Description: Delightful Bath is a realistic artwork depicting the first mug of happiness, simple pleasures on a hot sunny day.The genre scene is based on everyday bathing, a moment that is "special by not being special".The kid pours water over his head from an old tin can, kid starts smiling with joy , this makes the skin look shiny with small droplets of water rolling over his adolescent skin, Shadows are attained by leaving the dark parts of paper untouched and working with the highlights n mid tones with sun as the main source of light blessing the kid. Follow me for more such artworks.
  7. Sunshine

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: SunshineWatercolor on Paper 62.5 x 51 cms
  8. Sadhu

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: Sadhu Medium: Pastel on Paper Size: 75 x 55 cms
  9. Heal Me

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: Heal Me Medium: Colored pencil on Paper Size: 75 x 55 cms
  10. Meditation

    From the album My Paintings

    Title : Meditation Medium: Watercolor on Paper Size: 68.5 x 53 cms "Meditation is the highest form of control over your mind, ballet is the art of attaining the highest form of discipline over the body"
  11. One Fine Day 

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: One Fine Day Medium: Charcoal on PaperSize: 65.5 x 40.3 cms
  12. Buddha

    From the album My Paintings

    Title : BuddhaMedium: Colored Pencil on PaperSize: 64.4 x 55 cms
  13. Commissioned charcoal portrait

    From the album My Paintings

    Charcoal on Paper A3 size
  14. Commissioned charcoal portrait

    From the album My Paintings

    Charcoal on Paper A3 size
  15. Commissioned Oil on Canvas

    From the album My Paintings

    Oil on Canvas a2 size
  16. Commissioned charcoal portrait

    From the album My Paintings

    Charcoal on Paper A3 size
  17. study film.jpg

    From the album My Paintings

    charcoal on paper WIP
  18. Buddha II

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: Buddha II Medium: Acrylic & Oil on canvas Size: 42 x 32 inches
  19. My Parents wanted a Girl Child

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: My Parents wanted a Girl Child Medium: Colored Pencil on Paper Size: 75 x 55 cms
  20. Crippled Hope

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: Crippled Hope Medium: Charcoal on Paper Size: 75 x 55 cms " I was not crippled until I lost Hope "
  21. Ghar Ghar

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: Ghar-Ghar Medium: Charcoal on Paper Size: 75 x 55 cms
  22. Untitled

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: Untitled Medium: Charcoal & Pastel on Paper Size: 63.5 x 48.2 cms
  23. Sleeping Child ( Indian Apache Series)

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: Sleeping Child ( Indian Apache Series)Medium: Pastel on Toned paperSize: 70 x 50 cms
  24. Sadhu 2

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: Sadhu 2 Medium: Pastel on Paper Size: 70 x 50 cms
  25. Rainy Day

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: Rainy Day Medium: Charcoal & Pastel on Paper Size: 75 x 55 cms
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