Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'painting'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • A Test Forum
  • Introduce Yourself
    • Introductions
  • Getting Started with ArtByte
    • Explore our main website
    • Benefits to artists
    • Beginner
    • Joining the Community & earning free ArtBytes!
    • Creating (Mining) ArtBytes
    • Buying & Selling ArtBytes
    • Discussions about ArtByte communities
  • Announcements
    • ArtByte Artist Festivals
    • ArtByte Artist Showcase
    • ArtByte Announcements
    • Recent Press
    • Behind the scenes
    • ArtByte Roadmap
  • ArtByte Support
    • Wallet Issues
    • Help for Artists
    • Mining
    • Twitter & Reddit tipping events
    • Technical Discussions
  • Artist's Cafe
    • The Artist's Life
    • Inspiration
    • New Projects
    • Let's talk about art
  • ArtByte Foundation Artist Awards
    • ArtByte Artist Awards
    • Nominations for Artists
  • Artist Listing
    • Artist Listing How To
    • Actors
    • Dancers
    • Directors
    • Editors
    • Fashion Designers & Stylists
    • Film Makers
    • Graphic Designers
    • Interdisciplinary Artist
    • Artists working in virtual worlds
    • Models
    • Musicians
    • Painters
    • Photographers
    • Producers
    • Production Team Members
    • Sculptors
    • Writers
  • Artist Resources
    • Resources for Artists
  • Events
    • Places to use ArtBytes NOTE: NOT AVAILABLE FOR NY RESIDENTS
    • Services offered for ArtBytes

Blogs

  • Pappy's Joint
  • Andooga Design
  • satoshisun's Blog
  • KeshKreations' Blog
  • Panzzerirbis' Blog
  • AppleDApps' Blog

Categories

  • ArtByte

Calendars

  • Community Calendar

Categories

  • Articles

Found 247 results

  1. Mindblown

    Teasing of my latest painting. Acrylic on canvas, 100x80cm:
  2. Hello World!

    Hello everyone. My name is Rodrigo Lopes, aka Rodd Lopes. I'm from Brazil and have been drawing and painting since I was a small child. I never used traditional media, which means I've always used digital ways to create my art. Well, except for the time I was a child and used paper and pencil :). Today I paint and draw in Photoshop, Procreate (Ipad) and Sketchbook Pro. I don't have a certain recognizable style if you will. Some people say they can see something in common in all my artworks but I'm not so sure, I usually paint very different themes as Sci-Fi, landscapes, portraits etc. I really don't consider myself a professional artist, first because I don't work with art, I have a job which is quite far from creating art, secondly because I think I still have a long way to go, there are so many things I'm still struggling to learn. I'm a self-taught artist, actually I'm self-taught in pretty much all I know in life, English included. My mother language is Brazilian Portuguese. I like making friends and talking about art, movies, series and books. I'm outgoing and friendly towards everyone. I hope you guys like my artwork. Thanks for having me in this Forum. Below is my online gallery at Artstation: https://www.artstation.com/rodrigolopes THIS IS MY WALLET ADDRESS: ALDhjq8zvTDEF7n72ahTeDTHjMFwU91PxL
  3. Horse Digital, A4

    Hello I'm ALberto Esparza, hence, AESPA, a Chilean freelance artist and wanted to post this particular painting I did yesterday, and someone gave me on reddit some artbytes so thanks to that I learnt about this place...the piece is a study of a horse, and there is not much to say about it...more than, it mean Freedom, that's the idea behind the painting. so nothing more to add, hope ya' like it my artbyte wallet AVnxS47wnXsYvHoKjNEbpgsBJbH8KWdL5B My portfolio: https://www.artstation.com/aespa My IG: https://www.instagram.com/ae_spar I have an art prints store @society6 but I dunno if it's allowed to be posted here, so if you wanna se it PM pls
  4. A Me of Most Trades

    Hello, everyone. My name is Andrew Pydynkowski, and I create traditional and digital art along with some work in areas of graphic design such as logos. I am from central Minnesota, and graduated from college with a BFA in 2D Studio Art, but plan on going back for a Mixed Media or Graphic Design BFA followed up with an MFA eventually... hopefully. Most of what I used to make was random at the best of times; my main problem being I prefer to switch around my mediums and styles in which I work. My senior review professor said my studio looked like it was shared by 10 different artists, which is a nice double-edged sword of a phrase. Currently most of my art is made at the request of others, and I have lacked the motivation to create on my own time for my own purposes. After college I have been out of the loop from any real artist community and it has added to the things that hinder my work. Hopefully being part of a good artist community again such as here on these forums can allow me to build up some inspiration and confidence, and to in turn give the same back to others. So I look forward to talking shop and more with everyone on their artwork. You can check out some of my work here at my website. Thanks for taking the time to read and I hope to see you all around. Wallet: AQrmFhCxQ8NBmnwSVpgFyJUTJ8ptABdJvo
  5. Mindblown

    Acrylic on canvas, 100x80cm:
  6. Balanspad

    From the album My art (Serfijn Sein)

    Painting.
  7. Troisquoise

    From the album My art (Serfijn Sein)

    Painting.
  8. Trap (stairs)

    From the album My art (Serfijn Sein)

    Painting.
  9. Dinkies

    From the album My art (Serfijn Sein)

    Painting.
  10. Wisselpunt

    From the album My art (Serfijn Sein)

    Painting.
  11. Serfijn Sein art

    From the album My art (Serfijn Sein)

    This painting was made for one of my dutch stories.
  12. Small painting from 2018

    From the album Painting on Wood

    tree painted circles seem to form a figure in landscape
  13. From the album Painting on Wood

    Some unfinished works in my very small studio of only 2qm
  14. small painting on wood

    From the album Painting on Wood

    same as the first one but with geometrical patterns. Notice, there are three polygons with inner and outer rings. The beams go first trough the inner, then trough the outer ring.

    © istvan seidel

  15. parkerquinkdraws.jpeg

    From the album parkerquink draws

    parkerquink draws
  16. This week's ArtByte Artist Showcase Winner is digital painter, Marith. She is from Poland, currently living in Chile. She is the winner of 5,000 ArtByte and will be featured all week on ArtByte's 150,000+ social media! See more of her work on the ArtByte Forum here.
  17. A young woman portrait

    Hi, I would like to share with you some stages of the drawing process of a woman portrait I made with Photoshop This first image shows the freehand drawing I made using different "black pencils", changing the thickness and intensity to get different tones of greys. I added colour to the background. I start to paint the face too. only using greystones. The grisaille for the face is already made, I got the dark tones, mid tones and the brightest points. Now I give the colour of the skin to the face, painting in a transparent top layer the skin colour I have chosen. This way of painting emulates the old technique of oil painting created by Master of the Flemish school in the 16th - 17th centuries.
  18. David Inshaw | Romantic Painter

    David Inshaw, 1943 | Landscape / Pop Art / Romantic painter David Inshaw -born 21 March 1943 in Wednesfield, Staffordshire, England-, is a British artist who sprang to public attention in 1973 when his painting The Badminton Game was exhibited at the ICA Summer Studio exhibition in London. The painting was subsequently acquired by the Tate Gallery and is one of several paintings from the 1970s that won him critical acclaim and a wide audience. Others include The Raven, Our days were a joy and our paths through flowers, She did not turn, The Cricket Game, Presentiment and The River Bank (Ophelia). David Inshaw studied at Beckenham School of Art in 1959-63 and the Royal Academy Schools in 1963-66. A teaching post at the West of England College of Art, Bristol, in 1966-75 was followed by a two-year fellowship in Creative Art at Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1975-77. Inshaw moved to Devizes, Wiltshire, in 1971 and formed the Broadheath Brotherhood with Graham and Ann Arnold in 1972. The three artists were joined by Peter Blake, Jann Haworth, and Graham and Annie Ovenden in 1975, when the group was renamed the Brotherhood of Ruralists. The Ruralists exhibited together for the first time at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition in 1976, and Inshaw left the group seven years later, in 1983. He moved to Clyro near Hay-on-Wye in 1989 but returned to Devizes in 1995 and has lived there since then. Inshaw's paintings are held in many private and public collections, including the Arts Council of Great Britain, Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery, the British Council, the Royal West of England Academy, Tate Britain and Wiltshire Museum. A major book on Inshaw's life and work was published in 2010, the David Inshaw website and on-line gallery was launched in 2011, and Inshaw was made an honorary Doctor of Letters by Durham University in 2012. An exhibition of new paintings and The Badminton Game (on loan from Tate Britain) was held at the Fine Art Society, London, in 2013 with a second exhibition in 2015 to coincide with an updated edition of Andrew Lambirth's book on the artist. The Badminton Game was inspired by the gardens of Devizes and the landscape of Wiltshire. Inshaw has described how the place gave him a feeling of "mystery and wonder". He wrote about the painting: Its original title was a line from Thomas Hardy's poem "She, to Him": Remembering mine the loss is, not the blame. The painting was exhibited at the ICA Summer Studio exhibition in London. It is in the collection of the Tate Gallery since 1980. According to The Guardian, it is "one of the most enduringly popular images in the museum's collection". As of 2017, it was not on display. In 2011 it was the subject of an episode in BBC's series Hidden Paintings of the West. For more such artists' & artworks follow SUJITH PUTHRAN
  19. Submerged Drummer | Watercolor on Paper

    Title: Submerged Drummer Medium: Watercolor on Paper Size: 73 x 50 cms Please do comment if you like my painting artbyte address: AbcixgYXTTbXd2pgQhwhiYzKcpRFm2fcm4
  20. ART lowers Stress

    Stress-related hormone cortisol lowers significantly after just 45 minutes of art creation Whether you’re Van Gogh or a stick-figure sketcher, a new Drexel University study found that making art can significantly reduce stress-related hormones in your body. Although the researchers from Drexel’s College of Nursing and Health Professions believed that past experience in creating art might amplify the activity’s stress-reducing effects, their study found that everyone seems to benefit equally. “It was surprising and it also wasn’t,” said Girija Kaimal, EdD, assistant professor of creative arts therapies. “It wasn’t surprising because that’s the core idea in art therapy: Everyone is creative and can be expressive in the visual arts when working in a supportive setting. That said, I did expect that perhaps the effects would be stronger for those with prior experience.” The results of the study were published in Art Therapy under the title “Reduction of Cortisol Levels and Participants’ Responses Following Art Making.” Kendra Ray, a doctoral student under Kaimal, and Juan Muniz, PhD, an assistant teaching professor in the Department of Nutrition Sciences, served as co-authors. “Biomarkers” are biological indicators (like hormones) that can be used to measure conditions in the body, such as stress. Cortisol was one such the hormone measured in the study through saliva samples. The higher a person’s cortisol level, the more stressed a person is likely to be. F or Kaimal’s study, 39 adults, ranging from 18 to 59 years old, were invited to participate in 45 minutes of art-making. Cortisol levels were taken before and after the art-making period. Materials available to the participants included markers and paper, modeling clay and collage materials. There were no directions given and every participant could use any of the materials they chose to create any work of art they desired. An art therapist was present during the activity to help if the participant requested any. Of those who took part in the study, just under half reported that they had limited experience in making art. The researchers found that 75 percent of the participants’ cortisol levels lowered during their 45 minutes of making art. And while there was some variation in how much cortisol levels lowered, there was no correlation between past art experiences and lower levels. Written testimonies of their experiences afterward revealed how the participants felt about the creating art. “It was very relaxing,” one wrote. “After about five minutes, I felt less anxious. I was able to obsess less about things that I had not done or need [ed]to get done. Doing art allowed me to put things into perspective.” However, roughly 25 percent of the participants actually registered higher levels of cortisol — though that wasn’t necessarily a bad thing. “Some amount of cortisol is essential for functioning,” Kaimal explained. “For example, our cortisol levels vary throughout the day — levels are highest in the morning because that gives us an energy boost to us going at the start of the day. It could’ve been that the art-making resulted in a state of arousal and/or engagement in the study’s participants.” Kaimal and her team believed, going into the study, that the type of art materials used by participants might affect cortisol levels. They thought that the less-structured mediums — using clay or drawing with markers — would result in lower cortisol levels than the structured — collaging. That, however, wasn’t supported by the results, as no significant correlation was found. The study did find a weak correlation between age and lower cortisol levels. Younger participants exhibited consistently lower cortisol levels after they’d created art. Those results made Kaimal wonder about how young college students and high school students deal with the stress that comes from academia — and how creative arts can help. “I think one reason might be that younger people are developmentally still figuring out ways to deal with stress and challenges, while older individuals — just from having lived life and being older — might have more strategies to problem-solve and manage stress more effectively,” Kaimal said. In light of that, Kaimal plans to extend the study to explore whether “creative self- expression in a therapeutic environment can help reduce stress.” In that study, other biomarkers like alpha amylase and oxytocin will also be measured to give a more comprehensive picture. Additionally, Kaimal also plans to study how visual arts-based expression affects end-of-life patients and their caregivers. “We want to ultimately examine how creative pursuits could help with psychological well-being and, therefore, physiological health, as well,” she said.
  21. Saxophone player

    From the album My Paintings

    Title: Saxophone playerMedium : Pastel on toned paper Size: 63.5 x 48.2 cms
  22. The spider web

    Hi, the spider web is my last oil painting. I want to show you some stages of the painting progress hope you enjoy it. For the first layer, called underpainting, I have painted with brown and yellow ochre colours. I paid more attention to define the colour and light of the background. Basically, I used Burnt Umber, Titanium White, Yellow Ochre Pale and Ultramarine Light. Here I define some plants and leaves for the front using the same palette used previously. (The different tone is because I took this picture at night). At this stage, I start to place the flowers and give some green touches to the leaves in front. For the green colour, I made a mixture of grey and yellow (Paine's Gray and Cadmium Lemon). Now, my palette consists of different degrees of green that I made with Lamp Black, Cadmium Lemon and Titanium White. Here, for the leaves of the tree, I made almost the same mixture of green but with more yellow and I used a little yellow ocher as well. I worked on the flowers by adding white. With the colour white too, I drew the spider web. This is the finished painting. The following images show some details. Hope you liked these images. Thanks for regarding!!
  23. Hello everyone, I'm new to this forum, but I hope the category I chose is right. I'm Martith, a Polish artist adventuring abroad (currently Chile), self-proclaimed fox fanatic, with nature as a close second I'm self-taught, painting digitally for almost 6 years now. I love painting animals and doing photo studies. I'd love to present you some of my artworks. For photo studies I use mostly pictures licensed with CC0 license. Some of the artworks I've made are commissions, therefore I used photos belonging to their rightful owners My portfolio: http://martith.art ArtByte address: AV8cu6oG2tCBwbapsz3Xxhu6R2fshGES6h Other art socials: DeviantArt | YouTube | Instagram | ArtStation Thanks for checking out ♥
  24. Orange

    From the album Digital works

    © J.Van de Perre

  25. hand study

    From the album Digital works

    © J.Van de Perre

×